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Author: Connor Benedict

Celebrating the Public Domain in the Capital of Europe

Open Culture
Atomium in Brussels, photographed from below, in front of a clear blue sky. Prize winner of the Wikimedia Belgium Wiki Loves Monuments Photo Contest in 2023. Close-up of the Brussels' Atomium on a clear day By Geertivp, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Close-up_of_the_Brussels%27_Atomium_on_a_clear_day_(cropped).jpg

Last week, Creative Commons took part in the International Public Domain Day celebration at the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels. Two engaging roundtables were hosted, delving into copyright issues concerning the public domain and its future. The event united advocates for open access to cultural heritage, featuring presentations on topics like the monetization and decolonization of the public domain, as well as updates on the Europeana Public Domain Charter. Creative Commons introduced new guidelines published in February aimed at encouraging users to reference institutions when utilizing public domain cultural heritage materials.

What did Creative Commons do for Open Culture in 2023?

Open Culture
Laterna magica picture painted in color on glass plate. Pictures from the solar system. Laterna magica bild målad i färg på glasskiva. Bilder ur solsystemet. from Tekniska Museet Svenska, Public Domain Mark. https://digitaltmuseum.se/021016341596/laterna-magica-bild-malad-i-farg-pa-glasskiva-bilder-ur-solsystemet

2023 was quite a year for the Creative Commons (CC) Open Culture Program, thanks to generous funding from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing & Peter Baldwin. In this blog post we look back on some of the year’s key achievements.

On Openness & Copyright, EU AI Act Final Version Appears to Include Promising Changes

Better Internet, Policy

The EU’s political institutions announced that they have reached a tentative final agreement. While details are still not finalized and many questions remain regarding treatment of certain high-risk systems, the agreement appears promising relative to the recent Parliament text and from the perspective of supporting open source, open science, as well as on copyright.